eeTimes
eeTimes
eeTimes eeTimes EDN
Forgot password Register
Print - Send - -

Technology News

Nordic's new Bluetooth low energy SoC requires no specialist RF knowledge to design-in

February 22, 2012 | Paul Buckley | 222903087
Nordic's new Bluetooth low energy SoC requires no specialist RF knowledge to design-in Nordic Semiconductor ASA has released the company’s new µ Blue nRF8002 System-on-Chip (SoC) that provides a low cost, ultra-low power, easy to design-in single chip solution for Bluetooth Smart wireless tags and other accessories such as bracelets, pendants, keychains, small toys, and armbands.
Page 1 of 3
To add the Blue nRF8002 to a product design demands no specialist understanding of Bluetooth low energy wireless technology or any embedded firmware development. Using a Nordic nRFgo-compatible nRF8002 Development Kit, developers can design Bluetooth Smart tags and accessories using a simple graphical user interface that allows them to go no deeper than configuring the built-in application layer and mapping inputs and outputs to external components such as buttons, LEDs, and buzzers. The development kit even includes a small coin cell-powered tag design example that can be used for development, prototyping, and testing.

The nRF8002 is supplied in a compact 5x5 mm QFN package and includes a fully-qualified Bluetooth v4.0 low energy protocol stack, a highly configurable application layer, and built-in support for a range of Bluetooth v4.0 profiles including: Find Me, Proximity, Alert Notifications, and Battery Status. This - combined with market-leading power consumption - makes the nRF8002 an ideal solution for low cost, miniaturized coin cell battery-powered applications.

The Find Me profile allows users to pair small - but commonly misplaced - everyday objects with their Bluetooth v4.0 smartphone in order to locate either from the other. In a similar way to how people often phone their misplaced cell phones to make them ring and easy to find, a small nRF8002-based Bluetooth Smart tag attached to a keychain, for example, can feature an audible alarm that can be activated if the keys are misplaced by a pressing a button on a smartphone. Alternatively a misplaced smartphone could be made to ring or alarm by pressing a button on the tag.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next page









Please login to post your comment - click here
Related News
MOST POPULAR NEWS
Interview
Technical papers
Poll
What are your most important criteria when selecting an analog supplier?