AMS launches multispectral sensor pair

January 17, 2017 // By Peter Clarke
AMS AG (Premstaetten, Austria) has announced volume production of two digital multispectral sensors that use near infra-red visible light and can be used for consumer and industrial spectral analysis.

The AS7262 and AS7263 use wafer-level filter technology to provide visible and near infrared sensing, respectively. The ability to identify characteristic profiles of materials across such channels allows for use in material and product authentication and content analysis.

The sensors employ a fabrication technique which enables the deposition of nano-optical interference filters directly on the CMOS die. This interference filter is stable over both time and temperature and are smaller and more cost-effective than the components typically used in spectral analysis instruments.

The AS7262 six-channel visible light sensor measures visible light intensity at optical wavelengths of 450nm, 500nm, 550nm, 570nm, 600nm and 650nm. The output can be over I2C or UART digital interface. The AS7263 operates in the NIR spectrum detecting 610nm, 680nm, 730nm, 760nm, 810nm and 860nm infrared signatures. Both devices include an electronic shutter with LED drive circuitry, which means that designers can control the light source and the spectral sensing functions with a single chip.

"The dramatic reduction in the size and cost of spectral analysis enabled by our new spectral sensing solutions brings the lab to the sample for an incredible variety of applications from food safety and product authentication, to routine testing that can better protect both our health and our environment," said Jean Francois Durix, marketing director for emerging sensor systems at AMS.

The AS7262 and AS7263 are in volume production now. Unit pricing is $4.00 in order quantities of 1,000.

Related links and articles:

www.ams.com

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